Hazard Identification, Assessment, and Control


Hazard Assessment Procedure

Hazard assessments are a requirement of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Code - Part 2 Hazard Assessment, Elimination and Control and the university's Hazard Assessment and Control Procedure. The Hazard Assessment and Control Procedure sets out the requirements and responsibilities for identifying, assessing, and controlling workplace hazards at the University of Calgary.

Hazard assessments are required for all job positions at the University of Calgary and are to be completed using the Hazard Assessment and Control Forms (HACF). All job positions must be tied to a HACF — however, one HACF may be completed for a number of job positions with similar tasks.


Forms

To assist in the completion of formal hazard assessments and field level hazard assessments, EHS has developed a number of standardized templates which are to be used as a starting point only. Templates are fill-in forms which may be printed and/or completed electronically.


Caretaking

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Field Level Hazard Assessment

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HACF Templates - Summary of Tasks

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International Travel

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Laboratory

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Teaching/Administrative

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Technical/Engineering

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Trades

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Volunteer

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Hazard Assessment Training

Hazard Assessment Training is available online and is mandatory training for all university employees, supervisors and managers.


Responsibilities for Managers, Supervisors, and Employees

Managers and Supervisors

  • Complete Hazard Assessment Training
  • Complete Hazard Assessment and Control Forms (HACF) for, and discuss with, your direct reports. Involve affected employees when completing HACF. Updates are required at reasonably practicable intervals, after an incident or when changes to operations/equipment are implemented
  • Read and review the HACF for your job description and provide feedback to your supervisor/manager. Participate in completing HACF when requested
  • Provide, implement, and enforce the use of controls for hazards identified in HACF.
  • Use hazard controls identified in HACF, including engineering controls, administrative controls and personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Complete training in the use, care, maintenance and limitations of required personal protective equipment (PPE) identified in the HACF.
  • Implement or participate in a preventive maintenance program and process to maintain equipment and ensure defective equipment is not used

Employees

  • Complete Hazard Assessment Training
  • Read and review the Hazard Assessment and Control Form (HACF) for your job description and provide feedback to your Supervisor/Manager. Participate in completing HACF when requested
  • Use hazard controls identified in the HACF, including engineering controls, administrative controls and personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Complete training in the use, care, maintenance and limitations of required personal protective equipment (PPE) identified in the HACF.

Hierarchy of Controls

As required by Part 2 of the Alberta Occupational, Health and Safety Code, hazards are to be eliminated or controlled using the hierarchy of controls.

  • Engineering Controls (ENG) – Engineering controls provide the highest degree of worker protection because they eliminate or control the hazard at the source. Engineering controls are the preferred method of eliminating and controlling hazards.
  • Administrative Controls (ADM) – If engineering controls cannot eliminate or control a hazard, administrative controls can be used to control the hazard to a level that is as low as reasonably achievable. Administrative controls are less effective than engineering controls since they do not eliminate the hazards. Examples include: safe work policies, practices and procedures, job scheduling or rotation, and training.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – As a last resort, workers may need to use personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce the potentially harmful effects of exposure to a known hazard. PPE is much less effective than engineering controls since it does not eliminate the hazards. PPE is used when other controls are not possible and where additional protection is needed. These are considered the last line of control or defense.
  • Combination of Control Methods – Sometimes a hazard cannot be adequately controlled by a single type of control (engineering, administrative, or PPE). A combination of these methods may be required to effectively control the hazard. For example, the use of mechanical equipment may eliminate the need for manual lifting (engineering control) but supervisors are required to provide workers with appropriate procedures and training on the use of the mechanical equipment (administrative control).